Educational Response to COVID-19 from Jordan and other Arab Countries

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Author: Nour Awamleh, Research and Program Development Coordinator, Queen Rania Foundation

Update: A later version of this article was published on 13 April 2020 and appears on the Queen Rania Foundation website.

The Activating Edtech project in Jordan aims to develop an agile, iterative and evidence-based approach to the decision-making process within the Jordanian Ministry of Education. Activating Edtech aims to understand problems and assumptions in education, then tests out the possible solutions to those problems while trying to activate technology, where possible. The project started in January 2019 and continues to today. After introducing the team, we turn to the education response to COVID -19 across a number of Arab countries.

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Arabic version of Design Thinking for Educators

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Launched in January 2019, Activating EdTech Jordan is a project that aims to introduce agile development practices to educational technology policymaking. This project is led by the Jordanian Ministry of Education in partnership with the Queen Rania Foundation and Open Development & Education with funding from the UK Department for International Development (DFID). This post introduces the Activating EdTech project and our translation of Design Thinking for Educators.

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Activating EdTech Jordan: Sprint 6

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This week sees Sprint 6 for Activating EdTech Jordan. It also marks roughly one year since the start of the programme in January 2019. The programme is run by the Queen Rania Foundation under the EDRIL programme, funded by the UK Department of International Development (DFID).

Some of our outputs are available here: https://zenodo.org/communities/aet

New report on TVET in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Our new report on technical and vocational education and training (TVET) in Sub-Saharan is available in German:

Haßler, B., Stock, I., Schaffer, J., Winkler, E., Kagambèga, A., Haseloff, G., Watson, J., Marsden, M., Gordon, R., Damani, K. (2019). Berufsbildung in Subsahara-Afrika: Eine systematische Aufarbeitung des Forschungsstandes. VET Repository, Bundesinstitut für Berufs-bildung, Bonn, Germany. Creative-Commons-Lizenz CC BY 4.0. URN: urn:nbn:de:0035-vetrepository-775510-9 VET Repository: https://lit.bibb.de/vufind/Record/DS184013.

A Digital Object Identifier is available too https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3334690.

An English-language version will be available in April 2020. Please register here for a PDF copy: https://bjohas.de/go/tvet2020.

Some links I always share

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I’m at the TeacherFutures workshop (pre-PCF9) organised by the Commonwealth of Learning. Really interesting conversations with colleagues from Cameroon, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Nigeria, Uganda, Sierra Leone, South Africa.

In these conversations, I usually refer to a few Open Educational Resources, particularly for teacher professional development. These include the following teacher professional development resources:

These programmes are not the only such programmes, but they are distinct in that they provide concrete resources that are publicly available under Creative Commons.

There are a couple of other programmes I refer to. One is OpenUpResources (https://openupresources.org/), producing an open mathematics curriculum (in the USA) as well as Kolibri (https://learningequality.org/kolibri/), an innovative hybrid online/offline learning management system (with similar idea to some of the ideas advocated around 10 years ago here).

Publishing only PDF and not your sources is like voluntary entropy

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This post originally appeared here on 10th March 2018 under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Many documents from aid programmes are never published. However, even if they were published, in all my efforts to surface documents, I’ve only come across one word document. In fact, some time ago the Open University of Nigeria was interested in a programme to mass convert PDF back to Word.

Now, of course, there is conversation software (some smarter than others). However, it strikes me that converting, for example, an OpenOffice or Word Document to PDF is like the willful destruction of metadata (i.e. formatting data). Whether done accidentally or deliberately, it makes it  unnecessarily harder to work with the document.

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Video: What are the elements OER NEEDS to have the potential for teacher professional development?

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This post originally appeared here on 25th April 2017 under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

This is a screen recording of the presentation at the University of Johannesburg. It was recorded using the computer’s internal microphone, hence the lower quality audio).

Presentation: Bjoern Hassler – OER4Schools – Teachers Upfront – SA March 2017.pdf(info)

Video: T-TEL TPD Programme

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This post originally appeared here on 2nd March 2017 under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Below is a short video on the T-TEL Tutor Professional Development programme in Ghana (£17m, funded by DFID). Its Component 1 (Coaching, Tutor Professional Development) was developed between Open Development and Education and Cambridge Education. This included the design and execution of a three-year professional development programme for college lecturers in the 40 Ghanaian tertiary Colleges of Education (pre-service teacher education), covering subject-pedagogy, use of technology in education, gender-sensitive pedagogy, and integrating video and multimedia.

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