Predictive Models for Classroom Conditions

Key information

Location Tanzania
Start date May 2024
End date August 2024
Funded by FCDO
Collaborators Omdena

Background

Classrooms in Sub-Saharan Africa can often be uncomfortable places to be, let alone to teach and
learn in. Sweltering temperatures have proven negative physiological impacts. A meta-analysis
estimated that learning improvement can be increased by 20% with a temperature reduction of 10°C.

Classroom experience is strongly related to factors such as sound and temperature, as well as access
to light, levels of pollution, and disaster risk. An early indication of how big a sample is needed for the different measures is deemed important because not all schools can be surveyed. 

This project aims to understand (1) What the potential for AI models could be to determine certain conditions, like temperature, light and sound, (2) Understand for each metric how much data might need to be collected to produce an AI model with greater than 95% accuracy.

We will be using satellite imagery (giving school positioning), satellite temperature, Tanzania Meteorological Authority data, country weather zones, school locations we are aiming to evaluate which classrooms need.

 

Blogposts

Further resources

Regime Projects Tanzania, & Open Development & Education. (2024). Technical report for interventions in Kijichi Primary school: White paint, new roofs and ceiling boards [Technical Report]. Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1140
Nambatya, M. (2023). Benefits of using ISSB in school buildings (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 11). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1034
Nambatya, M. (2024). School buildings infrastructure in East Africa [Blog post]. Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1136
Haßler, B., Villavicencio Peralta, X. A., Macharia, G., Toyinbo, O., Nambatya, M., Mtebe, J., Schaffer, J., Wargocki, P., & Adam, T. (2022). Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa: Temperature, Lighting, and Sound Quality – Inception report (Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 1). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.0286
Koomar, S. (2024, April 2). What impact do climate conditions in classrooms have on teachers? [Presentation]. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1129
Villavicencio, X., Haßler, B., & Jengo, E. (2024, April 7). Project updates for Climate, Environment and Education Adaptation Research (CLEEAR) Tanzania Steering Committee [Presentation]. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1130
Ryan, B., Garner, S., & Flynnn, R. (2024, April 2). Identifying and prioritizing strategies to strengthen climate resilience of education systems [Presentation]. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1128
Anderson, E. (2024, April 2). Digital Earth Partnership: Climate, Environment & Education in Tanzania – Gaps & Policy implications [Presentation]. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1127
Wargocki, P. (2024). Education buildings: resilience to global climate change and avoidance of inequalities [Blog post]. Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1126
Toyinbo, O., & Villavicencio, X. (2023). Education and climate change – What retrofits could make classroom environments more conducive to learning? Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.0297
Villavicencio, X., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). What retrofits could make classroom environments more conducive to learning?
Haßler, B., & Bablok, B. (2024). Introducing the next iteration of our sensor box (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 15). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1064
Nambatya, M. (2023). The importance of climate-friendly school buildings in Africa (Blogpost – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 6). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1039
Haßler, B. (2023). How to build an IoT device with low-power sleep (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 13). Open Development & Education. https://opendeved.net/2023/11/27/how-to-build-an-iot-device-with-low-power-sleep/
Warwocki, P. (2023). Is indoor environmental quality in my school classroom safe? (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 12). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1028
Haßler, B. (2023). (Adapting to the) Impacts of climate (change): Temperature, Light, Sound, Air (Conference Paper (Utafiti Elimu) – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 3). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.0287
Villavicencio Peralta, X., & Megogo Bokamba, T. E. (2023). The “Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience” Study (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 2). Open Development & Education. https://opendeved.net/2023/03/23/ilce-study/, https://opendeved.net/2023/03/23/ilce-study/
Hassler, B., Villavicencio Peralta, X., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). ILCE: Trialling environmental sensors in Tanzanian Schools – First pilot (Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 7). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1019
Villavicencio, X., & Hassler, B. (2023). Project updates for Climate, Environment and Education Adaptation Research (CLEEAR) Tanzania Steering Committee (Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 12). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1032
Pattni, R., Villavicencio Peralta, X., Toyinbo, O., Proctor, J., Forbes, C., Atherton, P., & Haßler, B. (2023). Improving learning through classroom experience in Tanzania (Conference Paper (UKFIET,  Oxford, UK) – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 8). Laterite, Fab Inc, Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1025
Villavicencio, X., Haßler, B., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). Conducting surveys in Tanzanian schools – Second pilot (No. 9). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1036
Haßler, B., Villavicencio Peralta, X., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). ILCE: Conducting surveys in Tanzanian Schools – Second pilot (No. 9). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1021
Toyinbo, O., Villavicencio, X., & Haßler, B. (2023). Trialling environmental sensors in Tanzanian schools  –  first pilot (No. 7). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1035
Hassler, B., Villavicencio Peralta, X., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). ILCE: Trialling environmental sensors in Tanzanian Schools – First pilot (No. 7). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1020
Toyinbo, O., Villavicencio Peralta, X. A., & Megogo Bokamba, T. E. (2023). Possible Retrofit Interventions for Classrooms (Infographic) [Infographic – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa]. Open Development & Education.
Megogo Bokamba, T. (2023). The “Improving learning through classroom experience” study [Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa]. Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1038
Warwocki, P. (2023). School: a second home for the children (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 4). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1037
Villavicencio, X., & Hassler, B. (2023). Climate-resilient school buildings (Presentation – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 14). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1031
Fab Inc, Laterite, & Open Development and Education. (2023). Climate, Enviroment and Education – Presentation for the Tanzania Education Donors-Partners working group. Tanzania Education Donors-Partners working group, Tanzania.

Publications

All outputs from this programme will be available in our evidence library

Related programmes

 

Improving Learning through Classroom Experience

Key information

Location Tanzania
Start date December 2022
End date March 2024
Funded by FCDO
Collaborators University of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania); University of Oulu (Finland); Haileybury Youth Trust (Uganda); Yescon GmbH (Germany); Technical University of Denmark.

Background

Classrooms in sub-Saharan Africa can often be physically uncomfortable places to be in, let alone to teach and learn in. Sweltering temperatures have proven negative physiological impacts – regardless of children’s levels of acclimatisation. Furthermore, poorly lit or overly sun-exposed classrooms make it much more difficult to read and also introduce health risks (⇡Ibhadode et al., 2019). Lack of – or excess – light excludes children with poor eyesight, introducing an often unconsidered layer of inequity to schooling. Overall, these classroom conditions, all infrastructural in nature, are fundamentally part of the learner experience.

Funded by the UK Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, the Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience (ILCE) programme focuses on investigating whether modification of the built environment (temperature, light intensity, and acoustics) can positively impact the classroom experience to improve learning. The research is not expected to establish causation to learning, but instead to act as a proof of concept to build awareness and understanding of pertinent issues and to spur further research.

The programme is composed of two teams:

  • Team 1 will focus on at-scale learning assessment. The team will focus on the assessment of the overall environmental conditions and investigate how these can be linked to learning outcomes. Team 1 is composed of researchers from Fab Inc. and Laterite.
  • Team 2, comprising OpenDevEd and its collaborators, will focus on practical approaches to improve Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ). This includes exploring options to retrofit schools and making changes to buildings and the school environment.

Both teams will look to complement their respective work in order to ensure efficient use of time and resources, working to harmonised scopes of work, including work plans.

Contribution

OpenDevEd and partners will focus on the identification and testing of practical changes to the physical environment and infrastructure of schools.

OpenDevEd staff are responsible for the following activities:

  • Explore adequate measurement approaches to current conditions (temperature, lighting, acoustics) in schools across Tanzania
  • Through desk-based research and learning from innovative school buildings experts and organisations in the African region, possible approaches will be explored and analysed based on the characteristics of the Tanzanian context
  • Validate initial approaches through computer modelling
  • Quantitative data measurements of environmental conditions, collected with high-precision sensors
  • Qualitative data collection on students’ comfort
  • Implementation of cost-effective interventions on temperature, acoustics, and lighting in selected Tanzanian schools
  • Analysis of the impact of retrofits on the environmental conditions studied and on students’ comfort.

Resources

Blogposts

Further resources

Regime Projects Tanzania, & Open Development & Education. (2024). Technical report for interventions in Kijichi Primary school: White paint, new roofs and ceiling boards [Technical Report]. Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1140
Nambatya, M. (2023). Benefits of using ISSB in school buildings (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 11). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1034
Nambatya, M. (2024). School buildings infrastructure in East Africa [Blog post]. Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1136
Haßler, B., Villavicencio Peralta, X. A., Macharia, G., Toyinbo, O., Nambatya, M., Mtebe, J., Schaffer, J., Wargocki, P., & Adam, T. (2022). Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa: Temperature, Lighting, and Sound Quality – Inception report (Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 1). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.0286
Koomar, S. (2024, April 2). What impact do climate conditions in classrooms have on teachers? [Presentation]. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1129
Villavicencio, X., Haßler, B., & Jengo, E. (2024, April 7). Project updates for Climate, Environment and Education Adaptation Research (CLEEAR) Tanzania Steering Committee [Presentation]. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1130
Ryan, B., Garner, S., & Flynnn, R. (2024, April 2). Identifying and prioritizing strategies to strengthen climate resilience of education systems [Presentation]. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1128
Anderson, E. (2024, April 2). Digital Earth Partnership: Climate, Environment & Education in Tanzania – Gaps & Policy implications [Presentation]. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1127
Wargocki, P. (2024). Education buildings: resilience to global climate change and avoidance of inequalities [Blog post]. Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1126
Toyinbo, O., & Villavicencio, X. (2023). Education and climate change – What retrofits could make classroom environments more conducive to learning? Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.0297
Villavicencio, X., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). What retrofits could make classroom environments more conducive to learning?
Haßler, B., & Bablok, B. (2024). Introducing the next iteration of our sensor box (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 15). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1064
Nambatya, M. (2023). The importance of climate-friendly school buildings in Africa (Blogpost – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 6). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1039
Haßler, B. (2023). How to build an IoT device with low-power sleep (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 13). Open Development & Education. https://opendeved.net/2023/11/27/how-to-build-an-iot-device-with-low-power-sleep/
Warwocki, P. (2023). Is indoor environmental quality in my school classroom safe? (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 12). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1028
Haßler, B. (2023). (Adapting to the) Impacts of climate (change): Temperature, Light, Sound, Air (Conference Paper (Utafiti Elimu) – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 3). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.0287
Villavicencio Peralta, X., & Megogo Bokamba, T. E. (2023). The “Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience” Study (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 2). Open Development & Education. https://opendeved.net/2023/03/23/ilce-study/, https://opendeved.net/2023/03/23/ilce-study/
Hassler, B., Villavicencio Peralta, X., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). ILCE: Trialling environmental sensors in Tanzanian Schools – First pilot (Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 7). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1019
Villavicencio, X., & Hassler, B. (2023). Project updates for Climate, Environment and Education Adaptation Research (CLEEAR) Tanzania Steering Committee (Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 12). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1032
Pattni, R., Villavicencio Peralta, X., Toyinbo, O., Proctor, J., Forbes, C., Atherton, P., & Haßler, B. (2023). Improving learning through classroom experience in Tanzania (Conference Paper (UKFIET,  Oxford, UK) – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 8). Laterite, Fab Inc, Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1025
Villavicencio, X., Haßler, B., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). Conducting surveys in Tanzanian schools – Second pilot (No. 9). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1036
Haßler, B., Villavicencio Peralta, X., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). ILCE: Conducting surveys in Tanzanian Schools – Second pilot (No. 9). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1021
Toyinbo, O., Villavicencio, X., & Haßler, B. (2023). Trialling environmental sensors in Tanzanian schools  –  first pilot (No. 7). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1035
Hassler, B., Villavicencio Peralta, X., & Toyinbo, O. (2023). ILCE: Trialling environmental sensors in Tanzanian Schools – First pilot (No. 7). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1020
Toyinbo, O., Villavicencio Peralta, X. A., & Megogo Bokamba, T. E. (2023). Possible Retrofit Interventions for Classrooms (Infographic) [Infographic – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa]. Open Development & Education.
Megogo Bokamba, T. (2023). The “Improving learning through classroom experience” study [Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa]. Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1038
Warwocki, P. (2023). School: a second home for the children (Blog Post – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 4). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1037
Villavicencio, X., & Hassler, B. (2023). Climate-resilient school buildings (Presentation – Improving Learning Through Classroom Experience in East Africa No. 14). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1031
Fab Inc, Laterite, & Open Development and Education. (2023). Climate, Enviroment and Education – Presentation for the Tanzania Education Donors-Partners working group. Tanzania Education Donors-Partners working group, Tanzania.

Publications

All outputs from this programme are also available in our evidence library, see https://docs.opendeved.net/lib/?featured=KDV9V7XI.

Related programmes

Citizen Digital Literacy Policy Framework

Key information

Location Rwanda
Start date August 2023
End date January 2024
Clients Smart Africa

Background

The governments of the Smart Africa Member States recognize the urgency to drive inclusion and economic growth through the development and adoption of strategies for education and skills development to meet Sustainable Development Goal 4. Essential to this is ensuring all African citizens are digitally literate, a fundamental building block for promoting lifelong learning opportunities for all.

Our approach

Open Development & Education, with partners eKitabu, are contracted by Smart Africa to develop a Digital Literacy for Citizens framework for Africa. This framework which will promote and measure the safe use of digital technologies to access information, communication, eGovernance services, job skills, learning, financial or eHealth services. It will endorse inclusion of vulnerable populations and encompass the various inequalities within African digital contexts such as low access, low awareness, low literacy and low infrastructure, variations in access, core literacy levels, or perceived value of digital technologies.

Contribution

 OpenDevEd are engaged in the following activities: 

  • Conducting a comparative synthesis report on current digital literacy frameworks
  • Developing a set of policy guidelines to guide a systematic process of implementation of digital literacy frameworks in the region
  • Developing, contextualizing, adapting, validating, and launching a Citizen Digital Literacy Policy framework in five Smart Africa Member States
  • Conducting extensive stakeholder consultations, interviews, and focus groups to inform the development of the framework
  • Developing a digital readiness assessment tool for implementation of the framework, along with an adaptation guide for the framework specific to two Member States
  • Developing an Open Education Library, hosted on the Smart Africa Digital Academy’s eLearning platform, containing a foundational set of generic courses and content on digital literacy as a part of the framework

Resources

Evidence in Education

Key information

Location Worldwide
Start date 2019
End date Ongoing
Clients Various

Background

myevidence.io is a service that allows organisations to share their information and resources, including the registration of CrossRef DOIs.

Contribution

OpenDevEd is building tools to create online evidence libraries. An evidence library can be used by organisations and institutions to publicly share information and resources, optimally disseminating reports with DOIs and search engine optimisations.

https://educationevidence.io

https://docs.opendeved.net

https://docs.edtechhub.org

Technical assistance to KfW education programme portfolio

Key information

Location Jordan & Palestinian Territories
Start date May 2023
End date April 2024
Clients KfW Entwicklungsbank

Background

German development bank KfW has established itself as a major funder of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) programmes and partnerships in low- and middle-income countries. In 2021, with a budget of EUR 4.9 billion, it dedicated nearly 60% of its new education funding contracts to TVET programmes.

Open Development & Education (OpenDevEd) has been contracted by KfW to provide conceptual / technical advice and analysis during the implementation and further elaboration of a portfolio of projects in the Middle East:

  • “Quality Improvement for Basic Education II (Digitalisation)” in Jordan
  • “Supporting TVET through digital transformation processes” in Jordan
  • “UNRWA Digital Transformation in Health and Education” in the Palestinian Territory of Gaza

Contribution

OpenDevEd are providing the following key activities in support of the programme portfolio:

  • Creating terms of reference and programme activity designs for project feasibility studies
  • Development of technical and conceptual programme appraisal concepts, in line with existing strategies and funding
  • Conducting discussions with potential partners and stakeholders
  • Reviewing and providing analysis of budget reprogramming and disbursement requests
  • Reviewing and providing guidance on programme progress, providing support with key mission documents

Resources

Programme outputs will be published when made available on our Evidence Library.

Safe Education Sector Programme

 

Key information

Location Caribbean region
Start date March 2022
End date December 2023
Client Caribbean Disaster and Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA)

Background

The Caribbean Disaster and Emergency Management Agency’s (CDEMA) Regional Comprehensive Disaster Management (CDM) Strategy and Results Framework 2014-2024 forms the core of the Agency’s approach to disaster management. With additional funding from the Government of Norway, additional work towards advancement of CDM in Participating States aims to create safer schools, more resilient communities, safer buildings, and regional capacity building delivered through the Agency’s Regional Training Centre (RTC).

Our Approach

As part of the achievement of this vision, OpenDevEd (ODE), in partnership with FlowMinder and the UN Institute for Training and Research, has been contracted to develop Safe Education Sector Plans (SESP), and accompanying National Adaptation Guide (NAG) for Participating States. Four intended outcomes include:

  • Advancement of the SESP across all Participating States
  • Community-based disaster risk management is advanced in selected vulnerable communities within Participating States
  • CDEMA RTC is enhanced and provides standardized, accredited and sustained training that supports the improved rollout of national CDM programmes
  • CDEMA Safer Building training programme is advanced in all Participating States

Contribution

ODE staff are performing the following key tasks:

  • Delivery of key project deliverables, including Education Sector Diagnosis Report; six National Safe Education Sector Plans; Adaptation Guide; Education Sector Contingency Planning and Costing Guidelines
  • Overseeing the development of a self-paced online multimedia course to guide Education Ministry staff in the development of SESPs, as well as a blended/online training programme to increase awareness of and contingency planning for specific hazards
  • Overall project management, stakeholder management, and client liaison

Outcome

A cost-effective process for raising learning outcomes for children and young people.


Documents

HP Cambridge Partnership for Education EdTech Fellowship

Key information

Location United Kingdom & remote
Start date March 2023
End date May 2024
Clients Cambridge Partnership for Education

Background

Educational technology has the potential to significantly improve the effectiveness, sustainability, and equity of education worldwide, including in low- and middle-income countries. But to achieve these benefits while avoiding its risks and potential pitfalls, strong leadership is required in leading the incorporation of EdTech into education systems.

To this end, Cambridge University Press & Assessment’s Partnership for Education (CPE), with funding from industry partner Hewlett Packard, undertook to develop a proof-of-concept executive education fellowship. The blended course comprises learning delivered online and face-to-face in Cambridge. Once tested, this model can then be scaled to train multiple cohorts of fellows, creating a global network of EdTech policy leaders.

Contribution

CPE contracted OpenDevEd for the development and delivery of the executive education fellowship course. The course is aimed at senior civil servants, government advisors, and NGO and private sector education leaders who are responsible for EdTech transformation in their countries, with a curriculum focused on three key elements:

  • EdTech – Answering key questions around connectivity, devices etc. from the perspective of senior policymakers and actors. 
  • Design thinking – Supporting a design thinking sprint, introducing delegates to the wider design cycle.
  • Leadership – Understanding and developing skills to mobilise stakeholders across government silos and civil society.

The course centres on a blended model, comprising seven months of remote learning through a customised learning platform, coupled with a four-day in-person residential component delivered in Cambridge for a cohort of participants from sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East. Additionally, a three-month online-only model, with a synchronous online academy session, was developed for the participation of a wider cadre of EdTech policy stakeholders and public policy students.

OpenDevEd are responsible for the following activities:

  • Designing a blended learning model for the fellowship course, tailored to delegates’ national contexts and niche organisational roles
  • Developing course curriculum and learning materials, including developing an online learning platform suitable for in-person and asynchronous learning experiences
  • Identifying, contracting, and preparing expert tutors and moderators for delivering the course and providing tailored support to delegates as they progress through their studies, including through dedicated WhatsApp communities to deliver effective remote and peer learning
  • Developing a scalable assessment, collating performance data, and contributing to a project evaluation plan and report, including a publication on the use of WhatsApp in executive education
  • Liaising with CPE partners Cambridge Advanced Online and the Digital Education Futures Initiative to coordinate programme delivery and ensure alignment with overall programme objectives

Resources

HP Cambridge Partnership for Education EdTech Fellowship – Open Development & Education. (2023, September 22). https://opendeved.net/programmes/edtech-fellowship/, https://opendeved.net/programmes/edtech-fellowship/
McBurnie, C., Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Moustafa, N., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Module 3: Case Study Evidence Pack (EdTech Fellowship No. 6). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1004
Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Moustafa, N., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Module 1. Defining and understanding your ‘people’ and user base. (EdTech Fellowship No. 3). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1001
Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., McBurnie, C., Moustafa, N., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Module 3: Assessing readiness for EdTech in your education system (EdTech Fellowship No. 5). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1003
Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Moustafa, N., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Module 2: Building a pedagogically effective EdTech intervention (EdTech Fellowship No. 4). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1002
Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Moustafa, N., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Module 0.  Kick-Off of the EdTech Fellowship (EdTech Fellowship No. 2). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1000
McBurnie, C., Hassan, M. S., Moustafa, N., Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Prototyping (EdTech Fellowship No. 12). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1010
McBurnie, C., Hassan, M. S., Moustafa, N., Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). User Journey Mapping and Ideation (EdTech Fellowship No. 11). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1009
McBurnie, C., Hassan, M. S., Moustafa, N., Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Empathising with Education Stakeholders (EdTech Fellowship No. 10). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1008
McBurnie, C., Hassan, M. S., Moustafa, N., Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Introduction to Design Challenges (EdTech Fellowship No. 9). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1007
Moustafa, N., Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Module 4: Diagnosing adaptive challenges (EdTech Fellowship No. 8). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1006
McBurnie, C., Walker, H., Lurvink, A.-F., Moustafa, N., Macharia, G., & Haßler, B. (2023). Module 3: Case Study Scenarios (EdTech Fellowship No. 7). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.1005
Haßler, B., Walker, H., Moustafa, N., Macharia, G., Adam, T., Lurvink, A.-F., & McBurnie, C. (2023). EdTech Fellowship – Course Syllabus (EdTech Fellowship No. 1). Open Development & Education. https://doi.org/10.53832/opendeved.0288

Outputs from this programme are also available in our evidence library, see https://docs.opendeved.net/lib/?featured=U4AZLY6U.

EdTech Hub

Key details

Location Worldwide
Clients UK FCDO, World Bank, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and UNICEF
Partners Results for Development, University of Cambridge, Brink, Jigsaw

Background

EdTech Hub is a consortium-led programme, which aims to increase the use of evidence to inform decision-making regarding the most appropriate and effective uses of technology to improve learning, through cutting-edge research methods and innovation approaches.

  1. Generating rigorous research evidence on the effectiveness of technology for education, focusing on the most marginalised populations
  2. Engaging stakeholders in evidence-based decision-making on technology use in education

The programme is structured into three spheres of work: 

  • Research – Building a broader knowledge base around educational technology (edtech) effectiveness
  • Engagement – Working directly with partners and governments to promote effective edtech use in policy and practice
  • Innovation – Exploring new and innovative pathways to assist and enhance learning through technology, championing new ideas

The Hub’s work relates to technology and learning worldwide. Nonetheless, the programme also has a list of six low-and middle-income countries as its focus, particularly or its engagement work: Bangladesh, Ghana, Kenya, Pakistan, Sierra Leone, and Tanzania.

Our Approach

Our research identifies whether this TPD model addresses the needs of rural / disadvantaged teachers. The study focuses on a sample of teachers and students from schools in rural / semi-rural areas to understand whether and how school-based TPD initiatives promote student learning (as an alternative to traditional centralised and cascade models). The study addresses three key gaps that currently exist in the literature surrounding TPD in emergency contexts in the following ways:

  • Examining learning outcomes. Examining the relationship between TPD and student learning outcomes, using an exploratory mixed-methods design that goes beyond the limited approaches of previous studies.
  • Examining conceptualisation of TPD. Investigates the relative importance of education system components and aspects of TPD.
  • Examining definitions of ‘emergency’. The study focuses on Sierra Leone, where the population has experienced multiple, overlapping forms of emergency, and fills the gap in the EiE evidence base on improving learning outcomes despite contextual pressures.

Contribution

OpenDevEd is engaged across the whole programme, with the oversight of Dr. Björn Haßler as the Technical director of the Hub. Tasks undertaken by OpenDevEd staff include:

  • Rapid review Help Desk assessments for governments and clients in priority countries
  • Construction and maintenance of the Hub’s Evidence Library and publishing research with Creative Commons licensing
  • Leading agile sandbox innovations with external partners such as Jusoor Syria
  • Direct in-country engagement with Ministries of Education in Kenya, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, and Pakistan, integrating edtech into national education programming, promoting the use of open education resources, and partnering with tech providers (e.g. Kolibri)

Personnel provided: Technical Director, Tech Adviser, Researcher, and other short-term research and engagement staff as needed, dependent upon the expertise required by the Hub.

Resources 

Some of the most recent resources include:

For all our publications relating to this programme, see our Evidence Library.

EdTech Testbeds

Key information

Location Remote
Start date September 2022
Status In progress
Client Jacobs Foundation
Partners University College London, Leanlab Education and Itec KU Leuven.

Background

Although the education sector has been designing and evaluating educational technologies (EdTechs) since the 1970s, there are no systematic studies that have documented and evaluated the different methodologies for EdTech “testbed” design. Consequently, EdTech testbeds operate as “black boxes” with many of the processes and products rendered invisible to external audiences. Alongside, the diverse and sometimes competing goals for EdTech testbeds leads to varying metrics for their evaluation. Most are rightly concerned with evaluating the impacts of the particular EdTech on its beneficiaries, rather than evaluating the EdTech testbed approach adopted. However, there is a growing body of expertise and interest to unlock this black box as a means to better understand the diversity of goals, testbed design methods, stakeholders, funding models, timelines, and timescales etc.

Collaborators

The report is a collaboration between authors from:

Aim of the project

The symposium convenes an invited group of EdTech researchers, CSOs, policy leaders and practitioners to synthesise existing models for EdTech Testbeds in high, medium, and low resource contexts. A structured set of workshops, discussions and invited inputs will be designed and offered by the project management team and a final report that both maps the landscape and summarises key features of different Testbed models will be produced, alongside the specification for an EdTech Testbed Design Toolkit for Global Stakeholders.

Resources

  • Report:

Further links

Kaya platform and catalogue evaluation

Key information

Location Remote
Start date October 2023
End date January 2024
Client Save the Children UK

Background

Save the Children’s Humanitarian Leadership Academy (HLA) works to strengthen skills and capabilities within the humanitarian sector and beyond to better prepare for and respond to crises. Technology plays a key part in this objective, helping democratise access to quality learning. Kaya is the HLA’s global learning marketplace, where courses and resources are made freely available to humanitarians and organisations across the sector. The Kaya catalogue covers over 500 courses in 12 languages, accessed by learners in 190 countries.

In line with the HLA’s Theory of Change and Strategic objectives for 2023-25, Open Development and Education (OpenDevEd) was contracted to conduct an independent evaluation of the Kaya catalogue. This review will help the HLA continue to provide accessible, quality learning content to meet the needs of humanitarians worldwide. The evaluation covers the following core areas:

  • Catalogue / course status – Observing the structure, condition, and function of courses within the catalogue and ensuring that they meet the needs of learners and of those managing the learning content
  • Accessibility – Ensuring that the catalogue and course content meet the latest Web Content Accessibility Guidelines
  • Data flow and reporting – Helping the HLA team glean more from learner data to deliver a responsive learning product and make data-informed decisions regarding the management of the Kaya platform

Contribution

OpenDevEd are conducting the following activities:

  • Undertaking a comprehensive analysis of the Kaya platform, using Stufflebeam’s CIPP model to provide focused perspectives on context, inputs, processes, and product
  • Adapting collection instruments to gather data on the content’s structure, condition, and functioning
  • Collecting and analysing qualitative and quantitative data through a multi-method approach, consulting key stakeholders involved in the maintenance and upkeep of the platform, and considering the technological limitations of the Kaya platform’s underlying Totara system
  • Producing an evaluation report with a summary of analysis, complete with costed recommendations for the future development and maintenance of the Kaya platform

Resources

Publishable programme outputs will be made available in our Evidence Library.